Vaginal benign tumor

Introduction

Introduction to vaginal benign tumors

Benign vaginal tumors are mainly derived from the elastic fibers contained in the connective tissue of the vaginal wall. Such tumors are rare, often single growth, hard, pedunculated, basal activity, inconspicuous envelope, and more often on the vaginal wall. Small tumors have no obvious symptoms, and when they are enlarged, there may be a feeling of vaginal fall or sexy discomfort. Benign tumors of the vagina include fibroids, leiomyoma, hemangioma, lipoma, neuroma, myxoma, and papilloma. The name of the vaginal benign tumor generally does not produce obvious symptoms.

basic knowledge

The proportion of illness: 0.02%-0.05%

Susceptible people: multiple women

Mode of infection: non-infectious

Complications: rectal vaginal fistula

Pathogen

Causes of benign vaginal tumors

Cause:

Caused by a variety of reasons, no final conclusion.

Pathogenesis:

1. Vaginal benign tumors are mainly derived from nerve sheath cells. The tumor is located under the vaginal mucosa and has multiple nodules of varying sizes. The boundary is unclear and the touch is soft and elastic. Generally asymptomatic, occasionally larger, can cause vaginal discomfort or difficulty in sexual intercourse.

2, vaginal leiomyomas mainly from the vaginal wall muscle tissue or vascular wall muscle tissue. Myocytes are abnormally hyperproliferative and form a mass. The small fibroids are asymptomatic, and there is a feeling of vaginal swelling and disability during the increase.

3. Papilloma is a benign mucosal lesion. The clinical manifestations are diverse, and may appear as small, flat, filamentous, papillary or lumps in the vaginal mucosa, and may also be cauliflower-like. Patients may also have increased vaginal discharge, itching of the genitals, occasional bleeding after sexual intercourse, and few malignant changes.

Prevention

Vaginal benign tumor prevention

1. Actively treat diseases such as vaginal leukoplakia, chronic inflammation and ulcers.

2, where there are irregular vaginal bleeding, vaginal discharge abnormalities, early diagnosis and active treatment.

3, after vaginal cancer treatment should adhere to 3 to 6 months of review, should be cytological examination, recurrence of vaginal bleeding or vaginal discharge should be treated at any time.

Complication

Vaginal benign tumor complications Complications, rectal vaginal fistula

The following complications can occur: as the vaginal benign tumor continues to develop, the bladder vaginal fistula or recto-vaginal fistula eventually forms.

Symptom

Vaginal benign tumor symptoms Common symptoms leucorrhea abnormal sexual intercourse difficulty vaginal discharge increased pus and vaginal discharge vaginal bleeding vaginal discharge increased genital itching

Benign tumors of the vagina may be segmental or multi-sexual, varying in size, generally 2 to 3 cm in diameter, smooth in appearance, fixed, and sensitive to the capsule. Such cysts are often small and have no clinical significance, but occasionally they can grow very large, causing difficulty in sexual intercourse or painful intercourse, and even hinder delivery, sometimes compressing the trigone of the bladder, causing an increase in the number of urination. In very few cases, the slender cord-like pedicle can cause distortion and obstruction of the intestine. The contents of the cyst are mostly watery, serous or milky white, and also dark brown. Its color and viscosity vary depending on the presence or absence of intracapsular hemorrhage and the amount of bleeding.

Examine

Examination of benign vaginal tumors

The following checks are possible to confirm the diagnosis:

Feasible gynecological examination, tissue biopsy, triple diagnosis, etc. Endoscopic examination or palpation can be used to diagnose benign vaginal tumors. It can be seen that the vaginal wall has nodules, cauliflower, ulcers or local hardening. In the triad, in addition to examining the local lesions, attention should also be paid to the elasticity of the entire vaginal mucosa and whether the paravaginal tissue is involved.

Diagnosis

Diagnosis and differentiation of benign vaginal tumors

Diagnostic identification:

Vaginal fibroma

It is mainly derived from the elastic fibers contained in the connective tissue of the vaginal wall. Such tumors are rare, often single growth, hard, pedunculated, basal activity, inconspicuous envelope, and more often on the vaginal wall. Small tumors have no obvious symptoms, and when they are enlarged, there may be a feeling of vaginal fall or sexy discomfort. Patients with small asymptomatic tumors may have regular gynaecological examinations and, if necessary, undergo biopsy or resection.

2. Neurofibroma

Mainly from nerve sheath cells. The tumor is located under the vaginal mucosa and has multiple nodules of varying sizes. The boundary is unclear and the touch is soft and elastic. Generally asymptomatic, occasionally larger, can cause vaginal discomfort or difficulty in sexual intercourse. After the examination, the biopsy was performed first, and the diagnosis was performed after the diagnosis.

3. Vaginal leiomyoma

Mainly from the vaginal wall muscle tissue or vascular wall muscle tissue. Myocytes are abnormally hyperproliferative and form a mass. The small fibroids are asymptomatic, and there is a feeling of vaginal swelling and disability during the increase. The main treatment is vaginal surgery to remove the tumor.

4. Papilloma

It is a benign mucosal lesion. The clinical manifestations are diverse, and may appear as small, flat, filamentous, papillary or lumps in the vaginal mucosa, and may also be cauliflower-like. Patients may also have increased vaginal discharge, itching of the genitals, occasional bleeding after sexual intercourse, and few malignant changes. Treatment can be frozen, electrocautery, laser, topical application, etc., the larger mass can be removed by vaginal surgery. Regular follow-up is required after treatment to prevent recurrence or malignant sex.