Cerebellum-retinal syndrome

Introduction

Introduction

Cerebellar-retinal hemangioma syndrome, also known as Von Hippel-Lindau syndrome (disease), Hippel syndrome (disease), multiple vascular reticuloma syndrome, retinal cerebellar hemangiomatosis, hereditary central nervous system blood vessels Tumor, splanchnic cystic retinal angiomatosis, Hippel-Czermak syndrome, cerebellar reticular angiomatosis, retinal angiomatosis, Lindau syndrome (disease), cystic retinal angiomatosis, cerebellar visceral angiomatosis, cerebellum Retinal hemangioma syndrome, Lindau tumor.

Pathogen

Cause

unknown. May be associated with long-term exposure to sunlight, and repeated acute diarrhea in childhood can also cause cerebellar-retinal syndrome. Certain commonly used drugs, especially long-term use of corticosteroids in the eye or system, can cause cerebellar-retinal syndrome. Including the factors of the extraocular muscle itself, anatomical factors, innervation factors and genetic factors. Familial, may be related to heredity, usually autosomal dominant.

Examine

an examination

Related inspection

Counterattack electrocardiogram refers to screening for premature retinopathy screening

More common in men. Symptoms of the nervous system are extremely common, up to 90% to 100%. More adult onset, the disease range from weeks to years. The performance was the same as other cerebellar tumors, but it occurred late, progressed slowly, with obvious nystagmus, cerebellar ataxia, and decreased muscle tone. There are headache, dizziness, nausea, vomiting, papilledema, mental changes and other symptoms of high blood pressure. On-screen hemangioma is rare, and clinical manifestations are similar to benign tumors in the cerebral hemisphere.

Diagnosis

Differential diagnosis

To be differentiated from Joubert syndrome. This disease causes ataxia and balance disorders due to dysplasia of the cerebellar vermis. This syndrome is autosomal recessive, and the use of ultrasound to detect fetal cerebellum can be used for prenatal diagnosis, but it is often unsuccessful.

More common in men. Symptoms of the nervous system are extremely common, up to 90% to 100%. More adult onset, the disease range from weeks to years. The performance was the same as other cerebellar tumors, but it occurred late, progressed slowly, with obvious nystagmus, cerebellar ataxia, and decreased muscle tone. There are headache, dizziness, nausea, vomiting, papilledema, mental changes and other symptoms of high blood pressure. On-screen hemangioma is rare, and clinical manifestations are similar to benign tumors in the cerebral hemisphere.